Home Health Care Nurse at a Glance

Projected Job Growth

  • +0% Job Growth for
    Home Health Care Nurse

  • 2013
  • 2023

Average Salary for Home Health Care Nurse

  • $0 Annual Pay
    National Average
  • $0 Hourly Pay
    National Average

Best States for Home Health Care Nurse

  Employment
in 2011
Average
Annual Salary
Average
Hourly Pay
New York 123,260 $21,250 $10
Ohio 71,430 $20,800 $10
Minnesota 33,790 $23,220 $11

Becoming a Home Health Care Nurse

Most home health care nurses are registered nurses who have completed an associate or bachelor's degree in nursing or a diploma program. During nursing school, students will take many basic courses in the physical, social, and behavioral sciences as well as nursing courses to develop professional knowledge and skills. Additionally, students will complete clinical practicums to gain real-world nursing experience and try out different medical specialties.

Those who want to expand their basic nursing education to fit the needs of home health care nurse careers can do so by earning a certificate in geriatric care management, eldercare specialist, home health care, or another related specialty. Most students pursue these certificates after completing their RN or LPN/LVN degree or diploma program. Additional certifications are not always required for employment, but they can open the door for more exciting job opportunities in home health care. A typical geriatric care management or home health care certificate program includes courses in the following subjects:

  • Issues & Concepts in Gerontology
  • Communication in the Aging Network
  • Overview of Geriatric Care Management
  • Ethical, Legal, and Business Aspects of Geriatric Care Management

Upon completion of a RN or LPN/LVN program, graduates will prepare to take and pass the National Council Licensure Examination. Candidates are granted licensure by passing the exam and completing state-specific licensing requirements. Continuing education courses are generally required or strongly recommended for nurses who want to maintain an active license in their state.