Lawyer at a Glance

Projected Job Growth

  • +0% Job Growth for
    Lawyer

  • 2013
  • 2023

Average Salary for Lawyer

  • $0 Annual Pay
    National Average
  • $0 Hourly Pay
    National Average

Best States for Lawyer

  Employment
in 2011
Average
Annual Salary
Average
Hourly Pay
New York 67,210 $151,580 $73
District of Columbia 30,830 $165,590 $80
Delaware 2,820 $152,580 $73

Becoming a Lawyer

In order to qualify for entry level law jobs candidates must have completed a bachelor's degree and a three year juris doctor (J.D.) program. While there are not usually specific requirements about your choice of major during your undergraduate study, classes in English, government, public speaking, and history can be very helpful. Degrees in political science are also popular among prospective lawyers.

To get into law school, students will need to earn a sufficient score on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). Specific requirements will vary based on the schools you apply to. Once enrolled, students can expect courses in a variety of subjects, such as:

  • Civil Procedure
  • Contracts
  • Criminal Law
  • Legal Research and Writing

Graduates of a juris doctor (J.D.) program will then need to pass the bar exam in the state they wish to practice law in. Specific information for requirements in your area can be found through the National Conference of Bar Examiners. Many states also have continuing education requirements. This helps lawyers stay informed on recent developments and issues in the field.